PEOPLE AND HISTORY OF MOUNT GARNET
SPORTS LEGEND’S GREAT-GRANDFATHER LIES IN MOUNT GARNET 
By Frank O’Rourke  6th September 2008 Hugh Nawn, a California Creek miner who died in the Mount Garnet Hospital in 1913 and lies in the local cemetery, is the great-grandfather of Australian tennis champion Margaret Court, winner of 62 Grand Slam titles. My great-grandfather Hugh Nawn, who was also the great-grandfather of my second cousin - the tennis legend Margaret Court - was a miner in California Creek for 10 or 12 years before he died in the old Mt Garnet hospital in 1913. He is buried in an unmarked grave in the Mount Garnet cemetery. He was born in Ports, via Newtownbutler, Co. Fermanagh, Northern Ireland and was formerly the Publican of the Post Office Hotel at Enngonia, north of Bourke, NSW.
Frank O’Rourke and Margaret Court
When I went to Mount Garnet in 2005 I stayed at the Mt Garnet Travellers Park, whose caretaker gave me some material on California Creek and a mud map to get there. He told me that the wild mango trees could locate what is left from the old settlement of Ord and I drove out via the bed of the old railway line - a pretty desolate place.  As I crossed California Creek I found some mango trees on the left and some old brick foundations and earth works in the vicinity amongst the long grass, so presume that was all there was left of Ord. I did not want to poke around too much - fearful of snakes. I had earlier found our great grandfather's name in the electoral rolls for California Creek - so that is why I wanted to go there.
Barry Court and wife Margaret
I have always wondered whether my great grandfather actually went up that way with the Bourke Carrying Company - who had the camel based carrying contract to cart ore to Lappa Junction. Abdul Wade had that company and by the time he got the contract up your way, Hugh had moved back to Bourke from Enngonia after his wife died aged 32 in 1893 leaving him with 6 young children. He put the 5 girls into a girls orphanage (St John's Newtown Orphanage, Thurgoona) on the outskirts of Albury, NSW and allegedly his only son Hugh (Jr) lived in a gardener's cottage at the orphanage to keep the 6 children together. As the girls were admitted to the orphanage in early 1894, I often wonder whether after that, Hugh ever saw his children again. This was quite sad really, since the youngest girl aged just 2 years at that time was my grandmother, Margaret Muriel Nawn. Editor’s note: When this article was written, Frank O’Rourke was a 64-year-old Canberra resident who followed an honours course in history at the University of New England. He has a real interest in local history, particularly in places where his forebears lived and worked. We warmly thank Mr O’Rourke for his contribution.
PEOPLE AND HISTORY OF MOUNT GARNET
SPORTS LEGEND’S GREAT-GRANDFATHER LIES IN MOUNT GARNET 
By Frank O’Rourke  6th September 2008 Hugh Nawn, a California Creek miner who died in the Mount Garnet Hospital in 1913 and lies in the local cemetery, is the great-grandfather of Australian tennis champion Margaret Court, winner of 62 Grand Slam titles. My great-grandfather Hugh Nawn, who was also the great-grandfather of my second cousin - the tennis legend Margaret Court - was a miner in California Creek for 10 or 12 years before he died in the old Mt Garnet hospital in 1913. He is buried in an unmarked grave in the Mount Garnet cemetery. He was born in Ports, via Newtownbutler, Co. Fermanagh, Northern Ireland and was formerly the Publican of the Post Office Hotel at Enngonia, north of Bourke, NSW.
Frank O’Rourke and Margaret Court
When I went to Mount Garnet in 2005 I stayed at the Mt Garnet Travellers Park, whose caretaker gave me some material on California Creek and a mud map to get there. He told me that the wild mango trees could locate what is left from the old settlement of Ord and I drove out via the bed of the old railway line - a pretty desolate place.  As I crossed California Creek I found some mango trees on the left and some old brick foundations and earth works in the vicinity amongst the long grass, so presume that was all there was left of Ord. I did not want to poke around too much - fearful of snakes. I had earlier found our great grandfather's name in the electoral rolls for California Creek - so that is why I wanted to go there.
Barry Court and wife Margaret
I have always wondered whether my great grandfather actually went up that way with the Bourke Carrying Company - who had the camel based carrying contract to cart ore to Lappa Junction. Abdul Wade had that company and by the time he got the contract up your way, Hugh had moved back to Bourke from Enngonia after his wife died aged 32 in 1893 leaving him with 6 young children. He put the 5 girls into a girls orphanage (St John's Newtown Orphanage, Thurgoona) on the outskirts of Albury, NSW and allegedly his only son Hugh (Jr) lived in a gardener's cottage at the orphanage to keep the 6 children together. As the girls were admitted to the orphanage in early 1894, I often wonder whether after that, Hugh ever saw his children again. This was quite sad really, since the youngest girl aged just 2 years at that time was my grandmother, Margaret Muriel Nawn. Editor’s note: When this article was written, Frank O’Rourke was a 64-year-old Canberra resident who followed an honours course in history at the University of New England. He has a real interest in local history, particularly in places where his forebears lived and worked. We warmly thank Mr O’Rourke for his contribution.
PEOPLE AND HISTORY OF MOUNT GARNET
SPORTS LEGEND’S GREAT-GRANDFATHER LIES IN MOUNT GARNET 
By Frank O’Rourke  6th September 2008 Hugh Nawn, a California Creek miner who died in the Mount Garnet Hospital in 1913 and lies in the local cemetery, is the great-grandfather of Australian tennis champion Margaret Court, winner of 62 Grand Slam titles. My great-grandfather Hugh Nawn, who was also the great- grandfather of my second cousin - the tennis legend Margaret Court - was a miner in California Creek for 10 or 12 years before he died in the old Mt Garnet hospital in 1913. He is buried in an unmarked grave in the Mount Garnet cemetery. He was born in Ports, via Newtownbutler, Co. Fermanagh, Northern Ireland and was formerly the Publican of the Post Office Hotel at Enngonia, north of Bourke, NSW.
Frank O’Rourke and Margaret Court
When I went to Mount Garnet in 2005 I stayed at the Mt Garnet Travellers Park, whose caretaker gave me some material on California Creek and a mud map to get there. He told me that the wild mango trees could locate what is left from the old settlement of Ord and I drove out via the bed of the old railway line - a pretty desolate place.  As I crossed California Creek I found some mango trees on the left and some old brick foundations and earth works in the vicinity amongst the long grass, so presume that was all there was left of Ord. I did not want to poke around too much - fearful of snakes. I had earlier found our great grandfather's name in the electoral rolls for California Creek - so that is why I wanted to go there.
Barry Court and wife Margaret
I have always wondered whether my great grandfather actually went up that way with the Bourke Carrying Company - who had the camel based carrying contract to cart ore to Lappa Junction. Abdul Wade had that company and by the time he got the contract up your way, Hugh had moved back to Bourke from Enngonia after his wife died aged 32 in 1893 leaving him with 6 young children. He put the 5 girls into a girls orphanage (St John's Newtown Orphanage, Thurgoona) on the outskirts of Albury, NSW and allegedly his only son Hugh (Jr) lived in a gardener's cottage at the orphanage to keep the 6 children together. As the girls were admitted to the orphanage in early 1894, I often wonder whether after that, Hugh ever saw his children again. This was quite sad really, since the youngest girl aged just 2 years at that time was my grandmother, Margaret Muriel Nawn. Editor’s note: When this article was written, Frank O’Rourke was a 64-year-old Canberra resident who followed an honours course in history at the University of New England. He has a real interest in local history, particularly in places where his forebears lived and worked. We warmly thank Mr O’Rourke for his contribution.